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Dr Ian Plummer

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Technical
PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

14. HOOP POINT

  1. DEFINITIONS
    1. A ball scores a hoop point by passing through its next hoop in the order and direction shown in Diagram 1 as a consequence of one or more strokes. This is also known as running a hoop in order.
    2. The playing and non-playing sides of the hoop are defined relative to this direction, as shown in Diagram 3.
    3. The planes of the playing and non-playing sides are the surfaces constructed by raising a horizontal straight line against the relevant sides of the hoop uprights from the ground to the crown of the hoop.
    4. The jaws of a hoop are defined as the space enclosed by the inner surfaces of the uprights and the planes of the playing and non-playing sides.
  2. STARTING TO RUN Subject to Law 14(d)(1) to (3), a ball starts to run a hoop when it first breaks the plane of the non-playing side when travelling from the playing side to the non-playing side. However, if the ball subsequently moves back out of the hoop during the stroke and either:
    1. comes to rest in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side; or
    2. exits the hoop entirely on the playing side
    then it is deemed that it has not started to run the hoop.
  3. COMPLETING THE RUNNING Subject to Law 14(d)(4), a ball completes the running as soon as it no longer breaks the plane of the playing side when travelling from the playing side to the non-playing side. However, if the ball subsequently moves back into the hoop during the stroke and either:
    1. comes to rest in the jaws where it breaks the plane of the playing side; or
    2. exits the hoop entirely on the playing side
    then it is deemed that it has not completed the running of the hoop.
  4. SPECIAL SITUATIONS
    1. If a ball makes a roquet under Law 16(b) before it starts to run its hoop in order, it cannot thereafter score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke.
    2. If a ball first enters its hoop in order from the non-playing side, it cannot score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke. Having so entered, it must come to rest in a position entirely clear of the hoop or in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side before it can score the hoop point in a subsequent stroke.
    3. If a croquet stroke is played with the striker's ball placed within the jaws of its hoop in order in a position where it breaks the plane of the non-playing side, it cannot score the hoop point for itself in the same stroke. Having been so placed, it must come to rest in a position entirely clear of the hoop or in the jaws where it does not break the plane of the non-playing side before it can score the hoop point in a subsequent stroke.
    4. A ball may complete the running of a hoop in two or more strokes or turns. However, if the striker's ball has not completed the running and it either:
      1. becomes a ball in hand in preparation for a croquet stroke; or
      2. is lifted under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play))

      3. it must start to run the hoop again.
    5. A ball at rest cannot score or lose a hoop point solely as a result of a hoop being moved or straightened.
  5. PEELING If a ball other than the striker's ball scores a hoop point as a consequence of a stroke, it is said to be peeled through the hoop.
Running a hoop
DIAGRAM 3 - RUNNING A HOOP

When a hoop is run. a) the ball has not started running the hoop. b) the ball has started running the hoop. c) the ball has not completed running the hoop, and d) the ball has finished running the hoop.
Author: The Croquet Association
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Updated 28.i.16
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