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Dr Ian Plummer

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Technical
PART 2
ORDINARY SINGLES PLAY
A. GENERAL LAWS OF PLAY

15. PEG POINT

  1. HOW A PEG POINT IS SCORED Subject to Law 15(b), if the striker's ball is a rover ball:
    1. it scores a peg point for itself, and is then said to be pegged out, by hitting the peg as a consequence of a stroke (but see Law 38 in handicap play); and
    2. it may cause another rover ball to be pegged out by causing it to hit the peg as a consequence of a stroke.
  2. SPECIAL SITUATIONS
    1. If the striker's ball makes a roquet under Law 16(b), it cannot thereafter score a peg point for itself in the same stroke.
    2. If the striker's ball simultaneously hits a live ball and the peg in order, it is pegged out unless the striker claims a roquet by taking croquet.
    3. If, at the start of a turn, the striker plays a rover that is in contact with the peg, that ball is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.
    4. If the striker's ball is a rover and hits, or causes another ball to hit, another rover that is in contact with the peg, that other rover is pegged out unless it is hit in a direction away from the peg.
    5. If the striker's ball, being a rover, and another rover ball that it causes to hit the peg do so simultaneously, they are deemed to be pegged out in the order nominated by the striker.
    6. A ball at rest cannot be pegged out solely as a result of the peg being moved or straightened.
  3. BALL REMAINING IN PLAY A ball remains in play throughout the stroke in which it is pegged out and may cause other balls to move and score hoop or peg points. It may only be moved, picked up or arrested in its course if the state of the game will not be affected thereby.
  4. REMOVAL FROM COURT A ball ceases to be a ball in play and becomes an outside agency at the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out. The striker must remove a pegged out ball and the corresponding clip from the court before the next stroke. However, if he is about to peg out the striker's ball in the next stroke and the pegged out ball is unlikely to interfere, he may delay doing so until after the next stroke. If the pegged out ball is left in play thereafter, Law 30 applies.
Author: The Croquet Association
All rights reserved © 2009


Updated 28.i.16
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