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Dr Ian Plummer

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Technical
PART 1
INTRODUCTION
C. DEFINITIONS

6. STATES OF A BALL

  1. BALL IN PLAY A ball in play is one which may influence the game. A ball becomes a ball in play when it is played into the game under Law 8(b) or Law 26(a)(2). Except while it is a ball in hand, it continues to be a ball in play until the end of the stroke in which it is pegged out.
  2. BALL AT REST
    1. A ball at rest is a ball in play that is occupying a stationary position on the court.
    2. A ball becomes a ball at rest when:
      1. having been caused to move as a consequence of a stroke, it is deemed to have come to rest and has not become a ball in hand; or
      2. having been a ball in hand, it is replaced on the court.
    3. A ball ceases to be a ball at rest when it is caused to move as a consequence of a stroke or becomes a ball in hand.
    4. Subject to Law 6(b)(5), a ball is deemed to have come to rest when it appears to have stopped moving.
    5. A ball in a critical position is deemed to have come to rest only when its position has apparently remained unchanged for at least 5 seconds. If, in addition, its position needs to be tested (see Law 48(c)(4)), it is deemed to have come to rest only when its position has been agreed or adjudicated upon.
  3. BALL IN HAND
    1. Any ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency:
      1. when it is temporarily removed under Law 3(c)(2); or
      2. when it leaves the court; or
      3. when it is moved under Law 19; or
      4. when it must be replaced in order to rectify an error or correct an interference.
    2. The striker's ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency:
      1. when it is moved under Law 13 (wiring lift) (or Law 36 (optional lift or contact in advanced play)); or
      2. when a roquet is deemed to have been made; or
      3. when it is moved, picked up or arrested under Law 15(c) or Law 18(a)(2); or
      4. at the end of a stroke in which it makes a roquet; or
      5. at the end of the last stroke of a turn if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.
    3. A ball other than the striker's ball becomes a ball in hand and an outside agency at the end of a stroke if it comes to rest in the yard-line area.
    4. A ball ceases to be a ball in hand and an outside agency when it is replaced on the court and thereby becomes a ball at rest. However, if the striker has a choice of placement or replacement positions, he remains entitled to relocate it, thereby causing it to become a ball in hand again, at any time until the earlier of the start of his next stroke or the end of his turn.
  4. BALL IN A CRITICAL POSITION A ball is in a critical position if a minor change to its current position could materially affect future play. Examples may include positions in or near hoops, wired positions and positions on or near the yard-line or boundary. The striker must consult the adversary before moving or wiping such a ball.
  5. LIVE AND DEAD BALLS
    1. A ball other than the striker's ball is defined as being live or dead for the sole purpose of determining whether or not it may be roqueted and have croquet taken from it.
    2. LIVE BALL Any such ball is live at the start of a turn and becomes so again each time the striker's ball scores a hoop point for itself.
    3. DEAD BALL A ball becomes dead when croquet has been taken from it and remains dead until it becomes live again. The striker's ball may not take croquet from a dead ball. If the striker's ball hits a dead ball, it does not constitute a roquet.
  6. YARD-LINE AND CORNER BALLS A ball replaced on the yard-line is known as a yard-line ball. A ball replaced on a corner spot is also known as a corner ball.
  7. ROVER BALL A rover ball is one which has scored all 12 of its hoop points (but see Law 44(d) for shortened games).
  8. GROUPS OF BALLS A 3-ball group is formed by one ball being in contact with two other balls provided that if this occurs:
    1. at the start of a turn, any of the three balls is a yard-line ball; and
    2. during a turn, either of the two balls other than the striker's ball is a yard-line ball.
    A 4-ball group is formed by the fourth ball being in contact with a 3-ball group.
  9. BALL CLEAR OF A HOOP A ball is clear of a hoop if no part of it lies within the jaws of the hoop.
Author: The Croquet Association
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Updated 28.i.16
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